A COURSE OUTLINE 

Prof. Sue Lane Talley 

MAKE-UP WORK FOR MISSING CLASSES MAY BE DONE BY VISITING ONE OR MORE MUSEUMS OF ART, OR JUILLIARD, MANNES, OR MANHATTAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC PLAYS OR CONCERTS,  AND WRITING UP A REVIEW OF WHAT YOU SAW AND HEARD.  YOU MAY ALSO VISIT AND REVIEW A PRODUCTION OF NEW YORK CITY OPERA ($5). PLEASE SEE YOUR LISTING OF FREE MUSEUMS FOR DETAILS.

 Class 1:  What is “culture” and how  do the  Fine Arts relate to a culture? Culture as related to religion.  Example:  Russia. The spread of the Christian Gospel brought a culture to Russia which is more than 1,000 years old.  Some types of art from Russia are presented and discussed.

Class assignment:  Write a brief description of the videotaped performance you just witnessed.  What was it?  Who performed it?  How did you like it?  This information will go in your Portfolio which will be due at the end of the semester.

 Class 2:  Preparing for a visit to a great museum:  the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

Assignment:  Make 10 copies of your Art Analysis paper. Using the Metropolitan Museum’s Web site,  in each of  ten different parts of the museum, find one artwork you particularly enjoy.   Print out this art object or painting.  Then, fill in as much of the information on the attached analysis sheet as you can, using the information given about the picture.  Save all of this information to bring with you to the MMA.

 Class 3: Visiting the Metropolitan Museum of Art: A Self-Guided Tour.

In-Class AssignmentBring the pictures you printed out, together with the analysis sheets, to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  In the time that we have, find as many objects or paintings as you can in the various galleries.  Use a map given by the Museum to help you in your search!  You should have a good overview of the Metropolitan Museum of Art when you have completed this assignment.  Complete the sheets with your personal reaction to the work of art.  The pictures and sheets you have completed will go in your Portfolio.

 Class 4:  Media and Movements

First, there will be a discussion of the visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Secondly, there will be a discussion of the media of pictures, especially

1.      Drawing—pencil, charcoal, chalk, pen and ink

2.      Egg tempera: Made to last!

3.      Oil painting

4.      Acrylics and tempera paints

5.      Mixing colors and elements of composition.

Assignment: Read Chapter 2 in Perceiving the Arts.   Visit the Web site of the Guggenheim Museum of Art, New York City.  Find a painting that illustrates each of the following movements:  Impressionism, Cubism Abstract Expressionism, Surrealism.  Visit ArtLex and ArtCyclopedia to read more about the movements and the painters who created them.  (You may also refer to my lecture on the Web site.) Add these pictures, along with a brief story of each painter (half a page)  to your Portfolio.

 Class 5:  A Brief History of Painting

There will be a videotape and discussion about the history of painting today.  You should also have chosen your final project, and you may work out the details in the second half of today’s class. Students who wish to work in groups for final projects may  plan to do so, but there must be a clear-cut explanation in writing of what each member of the group will contribute. For example, a group might wish to make a collage of photography, prints of favorite paintings, ethnic artwork gathered from magazines and newspapers, etc.  Each member of the group should be responsible for collecting some materials, and all should work together on the composition, with one person perhaps superintending the operation.  One person could be appointed to collect phone numbers and Email addresses of the group members, organizing a time to get together.  Students who wish to do individual projects may do so, but they should let me know by this time what they are planning to do.   The end result should be neat and well-done, with some research involved in putting together an attractive work of art.  Do not just bring something you have done before and call it your project.

Class work: Plan your semester project and write a brief statement of how it will be accomplished, and with whom, if anyone.  Turn it in at the end of the class.

AssignmentRead Chapter 3, Sculpture, in Perceiving the Arts.  Place one picture example from each period of history described on page 71 in your Portfolio.  (You may need to use the Met Web site or some other site to do this.)

 Class 6:  Sculpture

A review of sculpture from Greek times to the present.  The dimensions of sculpture (full round, bas relief, linear, etc.) will be presented.  Particular attention will be paid to Greek and Renaissance sculpture, as well as to the sculpture of the 20th century. 

A visit to a sculpture site is planned; barring that, we will watch a videotape on sculpture.

Homework:  Visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art Web site.  Read about the sculpture garden  as well as Greek and Egyptian sculpture.  Find a bas relief by Della Robbia.  Compare these types of sculpture in a one-page essay, which you will place in your Portfolio.

NOTE:  LISTEN COURTEOUSLY TO STUDENT EXPLANATIONS AND PROJECTS AS PRESENTED.  ADD COMMENTS ABOUT STUDENT PRESENTATIONS TO YOUR PORTFOLIO. THESE MAY BE PUT ON THE ART ANALYSIS OR MUSIC ANALYSIS FORMS, IF APPROPRIATE.

 Class 7:  Music: The organization of sound and silence

Part 1: A discussion of the elements of music: pitch, rhythm, harmony, monody, polyphony, and the instruments of the modern symphony orchestra will be discussed.

A video presentation will be made during this class of one or more major works of music.  There will be a comparison of styles in music which are representative of the same theme (for example, the 19th century Aida and the 20th-century version).

In the second part of the program, several art songs will be presented live, as a student project.  The student should prepare a five-minute discussion of the composer or composers of the selection he has chosen.  Use your sheet to analyze the music which is presented today.

Assignment:  Read Chapter 4 in Perceiving the Arts.  Using the list at the end of Chapter 4, listen to one sample of music from each time period given (600-1400, 1400-1825, 1825-1900, and 1900-present).  Use a Music Analysis sheet to describe what you can of each sample.  Keep the sheets in your Portfolio.

Class 8:    More on Music:  A History of Christian Music

In this class, we will briefly touch upon styles and sounds of Christian music throughout the ages, with recorded examples.  In the second part of the class,  students who desire to present musical selections as part of their class project may do so.  These should be well-organized, with a typed explanation about the composer, how the song came to be composed (if possible), and the form and style of the music.  Just getting up and singing a chorus is not a fulfillment of a project requirement.  Musical presentations should be well rehearsed and of an excellent quality.  The explanation should take at least five minutes and the presentation, no more than ten. (Of course, there may be more than one presentation!)

Homework:  Read the outline of Christian music history.  Add to it information from your own tradition.  Put this material in your Portfolio.  THERE WILL ALSO BE A PORTFOLIO CHECK TODAY.  ALL PROJECTS SHOULD BE COMPLETED OR CLOSE TO COMPLETION FOR OUR MIDTERM GRADE.

 Class 9:  Dance.  Organized Movement

Dance, like music, is an art that comes and goes, and yet each has a “script.” In this session, we will discuss classical ballet, modern dance, and folk dance.  The chapter on dance quite naturally follows the chapter on music, since dance is usually accompanied by music.  The steps and symbolism of several forms of dance are discussed, as are great historical figures in dance and choreography.

In the second part of the class, those who organized a dance project may present it.  Please present it with a written explanation of what it is you are doing.  The explanation should take approximately five minutes, and the dance, no more than ten. Dancers should be dressed appropriately and should provide their own musical accompaniment. 

In-Class Assignment:  Make notes in class on the following questions.  Then, write your answers on one typed page:  How did the dance performed by the students work?  Did it successfully symbolize a story or situation? Was music well chosen?  If there was a story line, was it clear?

 Class 10:  Architecture.  We will discuss some of the characteristics of  the various styles of architecture:  Classic, Romanesque, Gothic, and modern in particular.  There will be a videotape about Frank Lloyd Wright.

Class presentations on photography will occur in the second half of the class. Prepare a written explanation of the location and subject of your photographs.

Assignment:  Visit the Web sites for St. John the Divine Episcopal Cathedral, the Guggenheim Museum of Art, and the Empire State Building.  Print a picture from each of these sites to include in your Portfolio. Read Chapters 8 and 9, Landscape Architecture and Architecture.  Visit a great building some time during the week and analyze its structure for your Portfolio.

Class 11:  Theatre: An Interpretive Discipline.  The physical elements of theatre will be discussed, as well as the development of theatre from the days of the ancient Greeks to the present. Students who have a theatre or mime project may present it at this time.  A written explanation of one to two pages should introduce the work. 

Assignment:  Read Chapter 5 in Perceiving the Arts.  Study the Basic Analysis Outline at the end of the chapter, as well as the Additional Study and Cyber  Sources.  Write a page discussing the following questions:  What qualities does theatre have that motion pictures do not have?  What, if any, are the advantages of live theatre?  Since theatre is “make believe,” how does acting affect the actor?

 Class 12:  Cinema.  Film has taken its place among the fine arts in the last hundred years.  It possesses many of the same qualities and challenges as theatre, but others as well.  As a demonstration, portions of  two films are shown which are taken from Shakespearean theatre.

Classwork:  In class, please compare and contrast the two Shakespeare presentations.  Then, tell how they might have been presented in Shakespeare’s day—costumes, scenery, and personnel.

Invididual projects may be presented today.

Assignment : Read Chapter 6, Cinema, in Perceiving the Arts  Using “A Basic Analysis Outline,” discuss a film of your choice.

 Class 13:  Semester Review.   In this class and the next, there will be a review of the materials covered in class.  All projects and portfolios should be completed and turned in.

Today’s review will include the names of great painters, sculptors, and architects throughout the centuries.  Approximately one half of the portfolios will be evaluated.

 Class 14: Semester Review..  Today’s review will cover music, film, and cinema.  The remainder of the portfolios will be due.

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